Bear's Lodge (Devils Tower) in Wyoming> NPS.gov. public domain.

Legacy On The Land: A Black Couple Discovers Our National Inheritance And Tells Why Every American Should Care

Bear's Lodge (Devils Tower) in Wyoming> NPS.gov. public domain.
Bear’s Lodge (Devils Tower) in Wyoming> NPS.gov. public domain.

I stumbled across this book review and thought it looked interesting. I haven’t read the book but thought I should pass the information along.

The book that speaks about the legacy of excluding people of color from the national parks and other natural areas.

Many of us have stayed in environmental circles for decades in spite of the “micro-aggressions” aimed at us. We are often told to leave because “we don’t belong here”. Assumptions were voiced we nothing about the land or environmental issues. I particularly find it funny since people of color (and those who love the land in general)  were told, for centuries, we were “too close” to the Earth for our own good.

I have noticed a change in tone, now that climate change and extreme weather are so evident. I notice some journalists are trying the, “aren’t we all to blame?” tactic.

No, we aren’t all to blame. When we expressed concern for the ecosystems we live in, we were called tree huggers and environmental wackos.  But we are sharing the same fate.

Our experiences bind us together.

The book is available on Amazon.com Legacy On the Land.

Read the article here:

via Legacy On The Land: A Black Couple Discovers Our National Inheritance And Tells Why Every American Should Care

 

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