Yellow WIld Indigo - Baptistia tinctoria in my garden.

Naturalist News – Winter 2013

Yellow WIld Indigo - Baptistia tinctoria in my garden.
Yellow Wild Indigo – Baptistia tinctoria in my garden.

Did You Know?

The full moon’s height in the sky at midnight changes with the seasons? November through February, the full moon is very high in the sky at midnight. May through July, the full moon is very low in the sky at midnight.

Harvest Moon in night sky (iStock photo)
Harvest Moon in night sky (iStock photo)

Some Past In Season Blog Posts on Spring Events

Nature in Winter: An Overview of the Season

Winter Seasonal Nature Journal

Winter Photography Tips

Winter Birds: Identifying Woodpeckers

Seasons

Winter Solstice – December 21, 2013

Imbolc and Groundhog Day – February 2nd, 2013; Spring begins to show

Spring Equinox – March 20th, 2013

Full Moons

January Full Moon – January 1st – Full Wolf Moon

February Full Moon – February 14th – Full Snow Moon

March Full Moon  – March 16th – Full Sap/Sugar Maple Moon (maple sap begins to run)

Full moons always rise near sunset.

A female Cardinal and a Dark-eyed Junco in the snow.
A female Cardinal and a Dark-eyed Junco in the snow.

Seasonal Events to Watch

Birds: Birds are in winter flocks. Which species travel together in your area?

Trees and Shrubs: Many trees and shrubs have next springs buds already on the tips of branches. Draw or photo and learn to identify trees and shrubs by their twigs.

Yellow WIld Indigo (Baptisia Tinctoria) covered in snow, in my garden.
Yellow Wild Indigo (Baptisia Tinctoria) covered in snow, in my garden.

Articles on Winter from Around the Web

How Birds Cope with Cold. 

Audubon Guide to Winter Bird Feeding 

Ten Simple Tips for Successful Winter Bird Feeding 

Setting a Winter Table for Wildlife  

Offer Water to Wildlife in Winter

 

Citizen Science to Participate In

Loss of the Night – Help scientists study the effects of light pollution by identifying the visible stars in the night sky. This project can be carried out anywhere.

Ice Watch USA – Help scientist study climate change by monitoring ice phenology. This project can take place in anywhere in the US.

FeederWatch – record the species of birds at your Winter feeders and share the numbers with scientist. 

That’s all for this issue. Look for the next Naturalist News at the beginning of spring.

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